Posts tagged "stadium bucket list"
29. Churchill Downs
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Built: 1875 - Capacity: 50,000 (seated), 164,858 (record, 2011 Kentucky Derby)
Home of the annual Kentucky Derby and the 2011 Breeders’ Cup.
This racecourse is a National Historic Landmark, earning the title in 1986. It is modeled after Epsom Downs in England.
Happy Derby day! Photo by Greg Verdino. Click the source for larger versions.

29. Churchill Downs

Louisville, Kentucky, USA

Built: 1875 - Capacity: 50,000 (seated), 164,858 (record, 2011 Kentucky Derby)

Home of the annual Kentucky Derby and the 2011 Breeders’ Cup.

This racecourse is a National Historic Landmark, earning the title in 1986. It is modeled after Epsom Downs in England.

Happy Derby day! Photo by Greg Verdino. Click the source for larger versions.

28. Arena Stožice
Ljubljana, Slovenia
Built: 2010 - Capacity: 12,480
Home of KK Union Olimpija, Slovenia’s representative in this year’s Euroleague.
The arena stands alongside Olimpija’s football stadium. 
Photo by Tomaž Štolfa.

28. Arena Stožice

Ljubljana, Slovenia

Built: 2010 - Capacity: 12,480

Home of KK Union Olimpija, Slovenia’s representative in this year’s Euroleague.

The arena stands alongside Olimpija’s football stadium. 

Photo by Tomaž Štolfa.

27. Fenway Park
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Built: 1912 - Capacity: 37,493
Home of the Boston Red Sox.
The stadium celebrated the 100th anniversary of its opening today, April 20th 2012, with the Sox losing 6-2 to the New York Yankees. It is the oldest ballpark in Major League Baseball.
The stadium may be most beloved because of its oddly shaped ballfield, due to the small footprint the park was built into. The right field pole is at only 302 feet, but the wall quickly curves to be much deeper. Lansdowne Street abuts the left field wall, so a large wall was built. In the park’s early years, a hill in front of the wall held berm seating, as can be seen in this picture. Also note that the “green monster” wasn’t always green.
Both pictures from the Library of Congress, circa 1912.

27. Fenway Park

Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Built: 1912 - Capacity: 37,493

Home of the Boston Red Sox.

The stadium celebrated the 100th anniversary of its opening today, April 20th 2012, with the Sox losing 6-2 to the New York Yankees. It is the oldest ballpark in Major League Baseball.

The stadium may be most beloved because of its oddly shaped ballfield, due to the small footprint the park was built into. The right field pole is at only 302 feet, but the wall quickly curves to be much deeper. Lansdowne Street abuts the left field wall, so a large wall was built. In the park’s early years, a hill in front of the wall held berm seating, as can be seen in this picture. Also note that the “green monster” wasn’t always green.

Both pictures from the Library of Congress, circa 1912.

26. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
Los Angeles, California, USA
Built: 1923 - Capacity: 93,607
Home of the USC Trojans. Former home of the Los Angeles Rams, Raiders and Dodgers. Host of the 1932 and 1984 Summer Olympics, as well as the first Super Bowl (then called the NFL-AFL Championship Game.)
It is one of only eight sports stadia to enter the U.S. National Historic Register*.
Photo by Flickr user MetroLA.
*: The list in the link includes some golf courses, historic districts and casinos that were not counted as sports stadia.

26. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

Los Angeles, California, USA

Built: 1923 - Capacity: 93,607

Home of the USC Trojans. Former home of the Los Angeles Rams, Raiders and Dodgers. Host of the 1932 and 1984 Summer Olympics, as well as the first Super Bowl (then called the NFL-AFL Championship Game.)

It is one of only eight sports stadia to enter the U.S. National Historic Register*.

Photo by Flickr user MetroLA.

*: The list in the link includes some golf courses, historic districts and casinos that were not counted as sports stadia.

25. Parc des Princes
Paris, France
Built: 1972 | Capacity: 48,712
Home of Paris Saint-Germain. Previous home of the French national football and rugby teams until the completion of the Stade de France in 1998.
The stadium hosted the final of the 1984 European Championship. France defeated Spain 2-0 to gain their first major international honours. The Parc des Princes also hosted several matches of the 1998 World Cup, including the third place match (Netherlands 1-2 Croatia).
Like the Stade Velodrome in Marseille, there was a cycle track around the original Parc des Princes, which was built in 1897. The stadium hosted the final leg of the Tour de France until 1967.
Photo by psgmag.net (flickr page)

25. Parc des Princes

Paris, France

Built: 1972 | Capacity: 48,712

Home of Paris Saint-Germain. Previous home of the French national football and rugby teams until the completion of the Stade de France in 1998.

The stadium hosted the final of the 1984 European Championship. France defeated Spain 2-0 to gain their first major international honours. The Parc des Princes also hosted several matches of the 1998 World Cup, including the third place match (Netherlands 1-2 Croatia).

Like the Stade Velodrome in Marseille, there was a cycle track around the original Parc des Princes, which was built in 1897. The stadium hosted the final leg of the Tour de France until 1967.

Photo by psgmag.net (flickr page)

24. Louisiana Superdome (Mercedes-Benz Superdome)
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Built: 1975 - Capacity: 76,468
Home of the New Orleans Saints and Tulane Green Wave, and the annual Sugar Bowl and New Orleans Bowl. Host of five NCAA Final Fours, including the 2012 Final Four. Attendance for the 2012 semifinal was 73,361.
The stadium acted as an emergency shelter during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. During the storm, the roof began peeling and the field level was flooded. The stadium was not used again until the Saints’ home opener in 2006.
Photo by Steve Driskell. Post-Katrina photo from Melanie Innis.

24. Louisiana Superdome (Mercedes-Benz Superdome)

New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Built: 1975 - Capacity: 76,468

Home of the New Orleans Saints and Tulane Green Wave, and the annual Sugar Bowl and New Orleans Bowl. Host of five NCAA Final Fours, including the 2012 Final Four. Attendance for the 2012 semifinal was 73,361.

The stadium acted as an emergency shelter during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. During the storm, the roof began peeling and the field level was flooded. The stadium was not used again until the Saints’ home opener in 2006.

Photo by Steve Driskell. Post-Katrina photo from Melanie Innis.

23. Michigan Stadium (The Big House)
Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Built: 1927 - Capacity: 109,901
Home to the University of Michigan Wolverines. The stadium will host the 2013 NHL Winter Classic; a 2010 hockey game between Michigan and Michigan State holds the single-game attendance record for a hockey match.
It is the third-biggest stadium in the world (not including auto racing venues). The stadium was built with the footings to be able to expand to 200,000 seats.
Photo by Flickr user AndrewH324.

23. Michigan Stadium (The Big House)

Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Built: 1927 - Capacity: 109,901

Home to the University of Michigan Wolverines. The stadium will host the 2013 NHL Winter Classic; a 2010 hockey game between Michigan and Michigan State holds the single-game attendance record for a hockey match.

It is the third-biggest stadium in the world (not including auto racing venues). The stadium was built with the footings to be able to expand to 200,000 seats.

Photo by Flickr user AndrewH324.

22. Newlands Stadium 
Cape Town, South Africa
Built: 1890 - Capacity: 51,900
Home of Super Rugby’s Stormers, and Western Province of the Currie Cup. The stadium hosted four matches of the 1995 Rugby World Cup, including the opening match and a semifinal.
Photo by Michael Williams.

22. Newlands Stadium

Cape Town, South Africa

Built: 1890 - Capacity: 51,900

Home of Super Rugby’s Stormers, and Western Province of the Currie Cup. The stadium hosted four matches of the 1995 Rugby World Cup, including the opening match and a semifinal.

Photo by Michael Williams.

21. Araneta Coliseum
Quezon City, Philippines
Built: 1960 - Capacity: 16,500 (boxing), 15,000 (basketball)
Home of the Philippine Basketball Association and the NCAA and UAAP Basketball championships, as well as the UAAP Cheerdance competition. The arena also hosted the “Thrilla in Manila,” the third and final fight between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, in 1975.
The listed capacities are above, but the arena has packed in crowds of over 22,000.
Photo by Flickr user trancedmoogle.

21. Araneta Coliseum

Quezon City, Philippines

Built: 1960 - Capacity: 16,500 (boxing), 15,000 (basketball)

Home of the Philippine Basketball Association and the NCAA and UAAP Basketball championships, as well as the UAAP Cheerdance competition. The arena also hosted the “Thrilla in Manila,” the third and final fight between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, in 1975.

The listed capacities are above, but the arena has packed in crowds of over 22,000.

Photo by Flickr user trancedmoogle.

A list of stadiums, arenas, fields, fieldhouses, gyms, rinks, grounds and gardens we all want to visit before we die.

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