Posts tagged "stadiums"
Starting today, a new list will be updated alongside the Stadium Bucket List, called the Former Stadium List. It will include stadiums that have been destroyed or gone unused.
1. Ali Sami Yen Stadium
Istanbul, Turkey
Built: 1964 - Capacity: 23,477 - Closed: 2011
Former home of Galatasaray SK.
The stadium became known only as “Hell,” as Galatasaray pulled many upsets in European competition over clubs like AC Milan, Real Madrid and Manchester United.
The stadium was replaced by the Turk Telekom Arena, which is an amazing facility in itself. However, this is hard to top.
Photo by Flickr user esmerrrr.

Starting today, a new list will be updated alongside the Stadium Bucket List, called the Former Stadium List. It will include stadiums that have been destroyed or gone unused.

1. Ali Sami Yen Stadium

Istanbul, Turkey

Built: 1964 - Capacity: 23,477 - Closed: 2011

Former home of Galatasaray SK.

The stadium became known only as “Hell,” as Galatasaray pulled many upsets in European competition over clubs like AC Milan, Real Madrid and Manchester United.

The stadium was replaced by the Turk Telekom Arena, which is an amazing facility in itself. However, this is hard to top.

Photo by Flickr user esmerrrr.

stadium-love-:

Now that the multipurpose stadium is a relic of the past, building a downtown stadium has become the new fad. Every mayor dreams of sparking downtown development around a glistening new stadium, and they are often seen as the city’s crowning achievement. But like anything else, there is a right and a wrong way to do it.
How to Build a Successful Downtown Stadium by Eric Jaffe

The article is interesting, but I’m not sure it reaches the right conclusion. I’m not sure that saying that Phoenix has a “polycentric urban core” is a good enough answer for why Chase Field failed. It seems like the downtown stadium’s success isn’t upon the stadium builders, but on the people responsible for developing the area around the stadium. I can think of two cases (Nationals Park and Red Bull Arena) where the developers dropped the ball, and the neighborhoods will probably suffer for some time because of it.

stadium-love-:

Now that the multipurpose stadium is a relic of the past, building a downtown stadium has become the new fad. Every mayor dreams of sparking downtown development around a glistening new stadium, and they are often seen as the city’s crowning achievement. But like anything else, there is a right and a wrong way to do it.

How to Build a Successful Downtown Stadium by Eric Jaffe

The article is interesting, but I’m not sure it reaches the right conclusion. I’m not sure that saying that Phoenix has a “polycentric urban core” is a good enough answer for why Chase Field failed. It seems like the downtown stadium’s success isn’t upon the stadium builders, but on the people responsible for developing the area around the stadium. I can think of two cases (Nationals Park and Red Bull Arena) where the developers dropped the ball, and the neighborhoods will probably suffer for some time because of it.

21. Araneta Coliseum
Quezon City, Philippines
Built: 1960 - Capacity: 16,500 (boxing), 15,000 (basketball)
Home of the Philippine Basketball Association and the NCAA and UAAP Basketball championships, as well as the UAAP Cheerdance competition. The arena also hosted the “Thrilla in Manila,” the third and final fight between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, in 1975.
The listed capacities are above, but the arena has packed in crowds of over 22,000.
Photo by Flickr user trancedmoogle.

21. Araneta Coliseum

Quezon City, Philippines

Built: 1960 - Capacity: 16,500 (boxing), 15,000 (basketball)

Home of the Philippine Basketball Association and the NCAA and UAAP Basketball championships, as well as the UAAP Cheerdance competition. The arena also hosted the “Thrilla in Manila,” the third and final fight between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, in 1975.

The listed capacities are above, but the arena has packed in crowds of over 22,000.

Photo by Flickr user trancedmoogle.

20. Stadio Luigi Ferraris
Genova, Italy
Built: 1911 - Capacity: 36,703
Home of Genoa CFC and UC Sampdoria.
Photo by the Flickr account of mentelocale.it

20. Stadio Luigi Ferraris

Genova, Italy

Built: 1911 - Capacity: 36,703

Home of Genoa CFC and UC Sampdoria.

Photo by the Flickr account of mentelocale.it

19. Wankhede Stadium
Mumbai, India
Built: 1974 - Capacity: 33,442
Home of the Mumbai Indians. The venue has hosted 21 test matches for the Indian national cricket team, as well as the 2011 Cricket World Cup final.
The ground was renovated and modernized for the 2011 Cricket World Cup, and capacity was reduced from 45,000. Here is the stadium pre-renovation, by Ashwin John.
Photo by Manosij Mukherjee.

19. Wankhede Stadium

Mumbai, India

Built: 1974 - Capacity: 33,442

Home of the Mumbai Indians. The venue has hosted 21 test matches for the Indian national cricket team, as well as the 2011 Cricket World Cup final.

The ground was renovated and modernized for the 2011 Cricket World Cup, and capacity was reduced from 45,000. Here is the stadium pre-renovation, by Ashwin John.

Photo by Manosij Mukherjee.

18. Estadio Banco Pichincha (El Monumental)
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Built: 1987 - Capacity: 75,000
Home of Barcelona SC, one of the most successful clubs in Ecuador.
Photo by José Luis Merizalde Alcívar. (EDIT: The first image on this post was another picture. I replaced it with Mr. Alcívar’s.)

18. Estadio Banco Pichincha (El Monumental)

Guayaquil, Ecuador

Built: 1987 - Capacity: 75,000

Home of Barcelona SC, one of the most successful clubs in Ecuador.

Photo by José Luis Merizalde Alcívar. (EDIT: The first image on this post was another picture. I replaced it with Mr. Alcívar’s.)

17. Signal Iduna Park (Westfalenstadion)
Dortmund, Germany
Built: 1974 - Capacity: 80,720 (65,718 all-seated)
Home of Borussia Dortmund, and host venue of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, including one semifinal.
The südtribüne (shown here) is the largest free-standing grandstand in Europe, with a standing capacity of 25,000.
Photo by Flickr user fanthomas2.

17. Signal Iduna Park (Westfalenstadion)

Dortmund, Germany

Built: 1974 - Capacity: 80,720 (65,718 all-seated)

Home of Borussia Dortmund, and host venue of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, including one semifinal.

The südtribüne (shown here) is the largest free-standing grandstand in Europe, with a standing capacity of 25,000.

Photo by Flickr user fanthomas2.

16. Anfield
Liverpool, England
Built: 1884 - Capacity: 45,276
Home of Liverpool FC.
It is unclear whether the club’s current owners want to renovate Anfield and add to its capacity or to build a new stadium in neighboring Stanley Park.
Photo by Andy Nugent.

16. Anfield

Liverpool, England

Built: 1884 - Capacity: 45,276

Home of Liverpool FC.

It is unclear whether the club’s current owners want to renovate Anfield and add to its capacity or to build a new stadium in neighboring Stanley Park.

Photo by Andy Nugent.

15. Stadion Crvena Zvezda (Red Star Stadium)
Belgrade, Serbia
Built: 1963 - Capacity: 55,538
Home of Red Star Belgrade, part-time home of the Serbian national football team, and host of the 1973 European Cup final and UEFA Euro 1976.
Photo by Avi Tattenbaum.

15. Stadion Crvena Zvezda (Red Star Stadium)

Belgrade, Serbia

Built: 1963 - Capacity: 55,538

Home of Red Star Belgrade, part-time home of the Serbian national football team, and host of the 1973 European Cup final and UEFA Euro 1976.

Photo by Avi Tattenbaum.

14. Koshien Stadium
Kobe, Japan
Built: 1924 - Capacity: 47,808
Home of the Hanshin Tigers, and Japan’s national high school baseball championships.
The stadium is the oldest ballpark in Japan. The stadium’s design was inspired by the Polo Grounds.
Photo by Travis Sanders.

14. Koshien Stadium

Kobe, Japan

Built: 1924 - Capacity: 47,808

Home of the Hanshin Tigers, and Japan’s national high school baseball championships.

The stadium is the oldest ballpark in Japan. The stadium’s design was inspired by the Polo Grounds.

Photo by Travis Sanders.

A list of stadiums, arenas, fields, fieldhouses, gyms, rinks, grounds and gardens we all want to visit before we die.

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